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Mount Dhaulagiri

At 8,177 meters above sea level, Mount Dhaulagiri ranks as the seventh-highest peak in the world. It is situated in the Dhaulagiri region of Nepal’s middle west. Two Sanskrit words—”Dhawala,” which means “white” and “dazzling beauty,” and “Giri,” which means peak, is combined to form the name Dhaulagiri. This peak’s name directly translates to “the white and brilliant mountain.” Tourists and climbers now focus their attention on Mount Dhaulagiri.

The highest peak entirely within Nepal is Dhaulagiri; all others are located along the Tibet/China border to the north. The tenth-highest peak in the world, Annapurna I, is located 21 miles (34 kilometers) to the east of Dhaulagiri and is 26,545 feet (8,091 meters) high. The highest peak of Nepal’s Dhaulagiri Himal or massif, which rises between the Bheri River on the west and the Kali Gandaki River on the east, is Dhaulagiri.

Dhaulagiri I is the full name of this mountain. However, the massif’s has other notable summits which are as follows:

  1. Dhaulagiri II: the 30th highest peak in the world at 7,751 m (25,340 feet)
  2. Dhaulagiri III: 7,715 m (25,311 feet) high and 135 meters in prominence
  3. Dhaulagiri IV: 7,661m (25,135 feet) high; its prominence is 469 meters
  4. Dhaulagiri V: 7,618m (24,992 feet) high, has a prominence of 340 meters
History of Mt. Dhaulagiri

After being found and surveyed by Westerners in 1808, Dhaulagiri was believed to be the tallest peak in the world. Before then, the 20,561-foot Chimborazo in Ecuador, South America, was thought to be the tallest mountain in the world. Prior to Kangchenjunga overtaking Dhaulagiri as the highest point on Earth in surveys in 1838, the former maintained that distinction for 30 years. Of course, Mount Everest took the top spot following surveys in 1852.

Attractions of Mt. Dhaulagiri

  • Get to the base camp of the seventh-highest peak in the world.
  • Cross the French Pass and Dhampus Pass, two high passes.
  • Mountain peaks in all their captivating beauty
  • Optical illusion of the Dhaulagiri massif
  • Trek along lovely, wooded trails.
  • Check out the secret valley.
  • Examine the outlying areas
Climbing Records of Mt. Dhaulagiri

On May 13, 1960, Mr. Ernest Forrer and his Swiss team K. Diemberger, P. Diener, and A. Schelbert used the Northeast Ridge to become the first people to summit the mountain. In 1950, a French team had the option of climbing Dhaulagiri or Annapurna, but following reconnaissance of Dhaulagiri, they chose to climb Annapurna. In 1953, a Swiss team made an attempt to ascend Dhaulagiri but was unsuccessful.

Best Time for Trip to Mt. Dhaulagiri

Trekkers believe that the spring and fall seasons are the finest times to visit Mount Dhaulagiri. However, you may also go on a trip in the winter and during the monsoon. But in certain seasons, it may be exciting and difficult.

Difficulty Lever to Reach Mt. Dhaulagiri

Having problems while traveling at a high altitude is frequent. While traveling in the high Himalayas, nothing is certain. Therefore, a few challenges you can encounter throughout the Mt. Dhaulagiri Trip are listed below:

  • Altitude Sickness
  • Route Difficulty
  • Weather Conditions
  • Physical Condition
Getting to Mt. Dhaulagiri

The recently constructed Dhaulagiri path is located to the west of Annapurna. The journey begins in the little settlement of Beni and proceeds north along the Myagda Khola junction. The paths from the Darbang take travelers through bamboo groves to the southwest camp of Dhaulagiri I.

Along with this camp, a steep trail leads via a small fissure to Chanbarden Glacier, an ice mass. After passing this glacier, the hikers continue northward till they reach Dhampus La and then the Kali Gandaki Valley. The journey is finally over when you arrive in Pokhara through Marpha.

-by: Bedu Khatiwoda for Land Nepal

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